GREAT BRITAIN Ally Slopper's Half Holiday Club Medal

Weight:

SKU:

Barcode:

Collections: Miscellaneous

Product type: Medal

Vendor: Britannianumismatics

Availability:

Description

GREAT BRITAIN Ally Slopper's Half Holiday Club Medal 31.5mm pierced for suspension

The magazine does not come with the membership medal

Ally Sloper's Half Holiday was a British comics magazine, first published on 3 May 1884.  Star Ally Sloper, a blustery, lazy schemer often found "sloping" through alleys to avoid his landlord and other creditors, had debuted in 1867 in the satirical magazine Judy — created by writer and fledgling artist Charles Henry Ross and inked and later fully illustrated by his French wife Emilie de Tessier under the pseudonym "Marie Duval".

The "half holiday" referred to in the title was the practice in Victorian Britain of allowing the workers home at lunchtime on a Saturday, a practice that also established the kick-off times of football matches.

The black-and-white weekly comic paper Ally Sloper's Half Holiday, typically of eight tabloid pages and priced one penny,was first published on 3 May 1884. 

Sales of the magazine have been estimated as being as high as 350,000, the magazine describing itself as "the largest selling paper in the world". The paper found a mixed audience: aimed at adults it captured both a loyal working class, male base, as well as attracting a cult following amongst the middle class of the time.

Although the weekly initially ceased publication on 9 September 1916, after 1,679 issues. It later had a few short lived revivals.

Membership of the Sloper’s Club was open to anyone who purchased the satirical magazine Ally Sloper’s Half Holiday for 12 consecutive weeks. Member’s received the ‘Sloperian Token’, which entitled them to visit the club at 99 Shoe Lane, Fleet Street, and were entitled to use the post-nominal letters M.O.S.C. (Member of Sloper’s Club). There was other memorabilia such as a Sloppers pocket watch and of a more serious nature a silver medal award for life saving.